Fruits from A to Z

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African cherry orange /Citropsis articulata

west_african_cherry_orange2The African cherry orangeCitropsis articulata,[1] also known as the West African cherry orange or Uganda cherry orange (locally as omuboro) is a small citrus fruit about the size of atangerine. The plant is endemic to Central and Western Africa, and used primarily for eating and in African traditional herbal medicine.[2]

In Uganda, an infusion made of the ground root of the omuboro, drunk once a day for three days is considered to be a powerful aphrodisiac for men only. Science has not investigated the veracity of this belief. Conservationists in Uganda are concerned that demand for the plant threatens the survival of this species’ genetic diversity in that country.[3]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_cherry_orange


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Ackee / akee apple / Blighia sapida or Cupania sapida; Sapindaceae)

Ackee fruit

Ackee fruit

The ackee, also known as acheeakee apple or akee (Blighia sapida) is a member of theSapindaceae (soapberry family), native to tropical West Africa in CameroonGabonSão Tomé and PríncipeBeninBurkina FasoCôte d’IvoireGhanaGuineaGuinea-BissauMali,NigeriaSenegalSierra Leone and Togo.[1]

It is related to the lychee and the longan, and is an evergreen tree that grows about 10 metres tall, with a short trunk and a dense crown. The leavesare pinnate,[2] leathery, compound, 15–30 centimetres long, with 6–10 elliptical obovate-oblong leaflets. Each leaflet is 8–12 centimetres long and 5–8 centimetres broad.

ackee-on-tree

ackee-on-tree

The flowers are unisexual and fragrant. They have five petals, are greenishwhite[3] and bloom during warm months.[4] The fruit is pear-shaped. When it ripens, it turns from green to a bright red to yellow-orange, and splits open to reveal three large, shiny black seeds, surrounded by soft, creamy or spongy, white to yellow flesh—arilli.[2] The fruit typically weighs 100–200 grams.[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ackee


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Acerola /Malpighia emarginata /Barbados cherry

Malpighia emarginata is a tropical fruit-bearing shrub or small tree in the familyMalpighiaceae. Common names include acerola (Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐse̞ˈɾɔ̞lɐ]),Barbados cherryWest Indian cherry[4] and wild crepemyrtle.[5] Acerola is native to South America, Southern Mexico and Central America, but is now also being grown as far north as Texas and in subtropical areas of Asia, like India. It is known for being extremely rich in vitamin C, almost as much as camu camu, although it also contains vitamins A, B1, B2 and B3 as well as carotenoids and bioflavonoids which provide important nutritive value and have antioxidant uses.[6] The vitamin C produced by the fruit is better absorbed by human organisms than synthetic ascorbic acid.[7]

Malpighia emarginata

Acerola is an evergreen shrub or small tree with spreading branches on a short trunk. It is usually 2–3 m (6.6–9.8 ft) tall, but sometimes reaches 6 m (20 ft) in height.[10]

Malpighia emarginata fruit

Malpighia emarginata fruit

 

Fruit

The fruit is a bright red drupe 1–3 cm (0.39–1.2 in) in diameter with a mass of 3–5 g (0.11–0.18 oz). Drupes are in pairs or groups of three, and each contains three triangular seeds. The drupes are juicy and very high in vitamin C(3-46g kg-1)[12] and other nutrients. They are divided into three obscure lobes and are usually acid to subacid, giving them a sour taste,[10] but may be sweet if grown well.[13]While the nutrient composition depends on the species and environmental conditions, the most common components of acerola and their concentration range are as follow: proteins (2.1-8g), lipids (2.3-8g), carbohydrates (35.7-78g), calcium (117 mg), phosphor (171 mg), iron (2.4 mg), pyridoxine (87 mg), riboflavin (0.7 mg), thiamine (0.2 mg), water (906-920g) and dietic fibre (30g)[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acerola


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Açaí palm a

The açaí palm (Portuguese: [aˌsaˈi] ( listen)) (Euterpe oleracea) is a species of palm tree in the genus Euterpe cultivated for their fruit and superior hearts of palm. Its name comes from the Portuguese adaptation of the Tupian word ïwaca’i, ‘[fruit that] cries or expels water’. Global demand for the fruit has expanded rapidly in recent years, and açaí is now cultivated for that purpose primarily. Euterpe edulis (juçara) is a closely related species which is now the primary source of hearts of palm

Açaí palm fruits

Açaí palm fruits

Eight species are native to Central and South America, from Belize southward to Brazil andPeru, growing mainly in swamps and floodplains. Açaí palms are tall, slender palms growing upwards of 25+ meters (82 feet), with pinnate leaves up to 3 meters (9.8 feet) long.[2] 

The seed makes up about 80% of the fruit

The seed makes up about 80% of the fruit

The fruit, commonly known as açaí berry,[3] is a small, round, black-purple drupe about 1 inch (25 mm) in circumference, similar in appearance but smaller than a grape and with less pulp, and produced in branched panicles of 500 to 900 fruits. The exocarp of the ripe fruits is a deep purple color, or green, depending on the kind of açaí and its maturity. The mesocarp is pulpy and thin, with a consistent thickness of 1 mm or less. It surrounds the voluminous and hard endocarp, which contains a single large seed about 0.25–0.40 inches (7–10 mm) in diameter. The seed makes up about 80% of the fruit (Schauss, 2006c). Two crops of fruit are produced each year. The fruits can be harvested and consumed.


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Abiu / Pouteria caimito

Pouteria caimito, the abiu (Portuguese pronunciation: [ɐˈbiw]), is a tropical fruit tree originated in the Amazonian region of South America. It will grow an average of 33 feet (10 m) high, and can grow as high as 116 feet (35 m) under good conditions. Its fruits shape varies from round to oval with a point. When ripe, it has smooth bright yellow skin and will have one to fourovate seeds.[ The inside of the fruit is translucent and white. It has a creamy and jelly-like texture and its taste is similar to the sapodilla — a sweet caramel custard. The abiu tree is part of the Sapotaceae family and is very similar in appearance to the canistel.

The fruit of Pouteria caimito is typically 3-9 cm long and yellow when mature

The fruit of Pouteria caimito is typically 3-9 cm long and yellow when mature

The flesh of ripe Abiu fruit is pale and of a custard consistency with one to a few seeds

The flesh of ripe Abiu fruit is pale and of a custard consistency with one to a few seeds

The fruit of the abiu tree is edible and considered one of the best of the sapotes[2] due to having the sweet caramel-like taste ofsapodilla with a smoother texture. It is commonly eaten out of hand and, although in Colombia those eating the fruit this way are advised to grease their lips to keep the gummy latex from sticking, this hazard can be avoided by selecting fully ripe fruits and scooping out the flesh with a utensil. The tartness of a bit of added lime juice may enhance the flavor, especially when chilled. The melting sweet pulp of the abiu is also used to flavor ice cream and cut into yogurt for a light and delicious breakfast. The subtlety of the flavor limits its utility in more complex confections and salads. Abiu fruit is a significant source of calcium, phosphorus, vitamin A, and vitamin C.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiu